Free Vowel Charts for Speech Therapy

My SLP confession is this… I still haven’t learned all of the phonetic symbols for vowel sounds. And you know what? I’m okay with that. With all my studies and work experience from Australia, the UK, and the USA, I was exposed to a LOT of symbols. Which means that I needed these free vowel charts years ago. Oops.

So while they’re currently lumped together in my brain, I still have #SLPgoals that:

Rebecca will be able to correctly transcribe words from a single word articulation test with 100% accuracy using visual supports.

Who are the vowel charts for?

Currently, I have free General North American English (for Canadian and American SLPs), and Australian English charts. They are suitable for SLPs, students, and therapy assistants.

SLP Vowel chart freebie

What do they include?

The charts are organised from by vowel position, starting with front, central, and then back vowels. Diphthongs are at the end of the chart. You will also find information on vowel height and lip roundedness.

What can you do with the Vowel Charts?

You can use them for your own learning (my plan!), hang them as posters in your speech therapy room, use them for a simple screener, or refer to them for facilitating speech sounds.

Where can I find more speech posters?

After you DOWNLOAD THIS FREEBIE and realize that one poster just isn’t enough, check out my new series of bright, informative posters and charts that you can use in your SLP practice.

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2 Comments

  • Hi Rebecca

    This is such a fantastic resource (as are all your resources)! Would you ever consider producing a version for British English vowels?

    Yours hopefully
    Carolyn

    Reply
    • Yes I’d love to! I just need an SLP who knows the British English vowels to give me the words and symbols 🙂

      Reply

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Hi, I'm Rebecca.
I encourage SLPs to feel more confident treating speech sound disorders, and make faster progress with their students.

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